Annamacharya, Anandabhairavi, Adi Talam

1620px-Tirumala 090615

Annamacharya on Advaita
“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players” said the bard of Avon in the 16th century. Nearly a hundred years earlier, Annamacharya in one of his songs nAnATi patuku nATakamu says this life is a play. The 15th-century Telugu composer lay down the structure of carnatic songs or krithis that we hear today. His devotion to Venkateshwara, the presiding deity of the temple in Tirupati comes through in a myriad of expressions with his songs as described in the article here.

Anandabhairavi – Pursuit of Happiness
One way to cope with the pandemic is to cultivate a positive mindset. Listening to melodies such as raga Anandabhairavi creates a positive state of mind. Anandabhairavi is an old melody with its origins in folk music. As its name suggests, the raga is believed to create a congenial atmosphere. Here is a composition of Shyama Shastri Marivere Gathi presented by sisters Ranjani-Gayathri. For more details on raga Anandabhairavi click here

Wiki-mridangam

Adi Tala – Basic Beats
Synchronized swimming and gymnastics are two ever-popular sports in the Olympics. Music not only embellishes the athletes’ movements but serves as a timekeeper. Much like a fisherman pulling on a net or rowers on a snake boat the beat or rhythm allows people to connect and move as one. The word rhythm comes from the Greek word rhythmos which means a regular recurring motion. From the simple 8-beat Adi tala to the complex Simhanandana, rhythm is a critical component of a trifecta it forms with melody and lyrics in carnatic music. Here is Ramana Balachandran presenting Neeke Teliyaka, a composition in Anandabhairavi and Adi Talam.

1 thought on “Annamacharya, Anandabhairavi, Adi Talam

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close